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Heathrow: High Alert for Bombs Hidden in Breast Implants

Mon, August 19, 2013

Woman being scanned by airport security. Present technology cannot detect breast implant bombs (Photo © Reuters)

Woman being scanned by airport security. Present technology cannot detect breast implant bombs (Photo © Reuters)

The UK's busiest airport, Heathrow, has been put on high terror alert after "credible" intelligence emerged that al-Qaeda is plotting attacks on airlines flying out of London with the help of women suicide bombers with explosives concealed in breast implants.

"There are genuine fears over this. We have been told to pay particular attention to females who may have concealed hidden explosives in their breasts. This is particularly difficult for us to pick up but we are on a very high state of alert," said an official with airport security, as quoted by the Daily Mail.

 "It's led to long queues here at Heathrow, much longer than usual at this time of the year. But because it's the summer holiday season, no one has complained," the offical said.

Al-Qaeda's chief bomb-maker, Ibrahim al-Asiri, is understood to have developed the method of foiling airport scanners by concealing explosives in an implant or a body cavity. It is feared that there is no shortage of volunteers willing to take part in such an atrocity after hundreds of extremists recently escaped from prison in Pakistan.

A security specialist said breast implant bombs – large enough to take down a plane --could be set off by injecting another liquid into them. "Both are very difficult to pick up with current technology and they are petrified al-Qaeda are a step ahead here. It's pretty top secret and potentially very grisly and ghastly," the expert said.

Independent security analyst Paul Beaver explained that the possibility of medically implanted explosives is a concern to the industry. There are two main ways of initiating a detonation, by chemical reaction or radio controlled detonators.

"The general alert state remains the same in the UK, but overseas the recent Pakistani prison breakouts and foiled attacks in Yemen are raising fears of a new jihadist wave of violence," he said.